Young and Matured Henry Cowell with his music note.
 
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Henry Cowell: Mind over Music

ner's seven "frames of mind" (though with the warning that I am no psychologist and my opinions no more than a layman's impressions):

(1) Linguistic Intelligence. Here Cowell had a slow start. That delayed his maturi- tv as a sophisticated speller, but it did not impair his grasp of word sense. Gardner views poetrv as the touchstone of linguistic intelligence. Cowell did not often or seriously essav poetrv in the ordinary sense of the term, but in one special domain close to poetrv he displayed a kind of mystic sensitivity to words that in my experience is unique: his titles for those of his works not tied to generic titles (e.g., sonata or concerto) or dictated bv Irish or other extra-musical matter (e.g., dances or plays). The paths of meaning he pursued in searching for the right title for a piano piece I have not (to my chagrin) been able to deduce. What made him consider 22 dif- ferent titles before settling on Conservative Estimate? And what, a little later, made him discard Conservative Estimate in favor of Dash! Tiger for a new version of the pieced There are many such titles one yearns to have explained-although Cowell no doubt would paraphrase Archibald MacLeish and protest that "A title should not mean / But be."

(2) Musical Intelligence. "Of all the gifts with which individuals may be endowed, none emerges earlier than musical talent. ... It remains uncertain just why musical talent emerges so early, and what the nature of this gift might be. A study of musical intelligence may help us understand the special flavor of music, and at the same time illuminate its relation to other forms of human intellect" (Gardner, p99). Gard- ner begins with examples of child prodigies, who are remarkable only because they can do something ordinary at a much earlier age than ordinary persons. He should have read Terman's account of one Henry w-ho was remarkable because at a very voung age he did musical things no one else of any age had done-and did them entirely in his head with no instrument to assist him. Here is a bit of how that Henry remembered the various stages in his development as a creator of music (injiis arti- cle "The Process of Musical Creation," American Journal of Psychology 37:2 [Apr 1926], p233-36):

As a child I was compelled to make my mind into a musical instrument because be- tween the ages of eight and fourteen years I had no other, yet desired strongly to hear music frequently. I could not attend enough concerts to satisfy the craving for music, so I formed the habit, when I did attend them, of deliberately rehearsing the composi- tions I heard and liked, in order that I might play them over mentally whenever I chose_ At first the rehearsal was verv imperfect. I could only hear the melody and a mere snatch of the harmonv. and had to make great effort to hear the right tone-quality. I would try, for instance, to hear a violin tone, but unless I worked hard to keep a grip on it, it would shade off into something indeterminate.
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Henry Cowell: Mind over Music