Young and Matured Henry Cowell with his music note.
 
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Henry Cowell: Mind over Music

as memory of all the eventualities that may come. Success, whether at composition or at chess, requires one to select almost instinctively (but with the instinct guided by "memory" flashes of the various possibilities) the right choices out of the many that flood the mind in each new situation. In chess the spatial imagery is visual, in composition it is auditory, but the two have much in common.

Gardner has a section on "The Visual-Spatial Arts" in which he discusses the spatial functions of painters and sculptors (surely architects too are taken for granted). He strangely does not consider the dance here, saving it for his next chapter on bodily- kinesthetic intelligence. He thus overlooks, I think, the highly spatial concerns of the dancer; and especially of the choreographer on the one hand and the viewer on the other. Cowell seems to have had an uncommon affinity for the dance- modern dance, at least. His invention of "elastic form" to allow the dancer- choreographer to make music of exactly the right duration for the movements in- tended dealt in musical terms precisely with the spatial result.

(5) Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence. This is one mental area where some musicians- composers in particular-might be considered hors de combat. Conductors, of course, and opera singers, trombonists, and bass fiddlers-all combine considerable bodily motion with their performances. (Oboists display the least motion, but for that very reason their job calls for the highest degree of kinesthetic control.) In order to make the point that Cowell rated extremely, indeed astonishingly, high in this department there is no need, fortunately, to analyze the mental gyrations of his composing. Reviews of his piano playing during the 1920s and later are sufficient. His tone clusters required great precision in movement as well as the more obvious muscular force. What other musician has been reviewed (on at least two occasions) by the sports reporter of a newspaper rather than its music critic? Piano as Cowell played it called for a high degree of kinesthetic action, governed of course by his musical intelligence.

(6) and (7) The Personal Intelligences. One is intra-personal (turned inward, an awareness of self), the other inter-personal, concerned with one's relations with the community and all other beings. Terman's remarks on how others perceived young Henry testify that his early life gave him a strong inward orientation; so does his own account of his determined development of an unusual process of musical crea- , tion. Throughout his life he seems to have exhibited an unusual degree of self-control. Ridicule and harsh opinions from reviewers never seemed to bother him; he simply shrugged them off and went on to his next recital or the next work evolving in his head; and nowhere in the several hundred letters written from prison between May 1936 and July 1940 do we find even a hint of despair or self-pity.
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Henry Cowell: Mind over Music