Young and Matured Henry Cowell with his music note.
 
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Henry Cowell: Mind over Music

What is remarkable is that this strong sense of an inner self, evident from Cowell's early childhood, came to be accompanied in adult life by an equally strong sense of community awareness, a realization of what made other people tick and what one had to do to accomplish things through cooperation. He was apparently a bit on the brash and cocky side at first, all the more so as he began to overcome the poverty and isolation of his youth and to win some public acclaim. But he soon grew kind, thoughtful of the needs of others, ready to help when he could-whether the father figure of Charles Ives or one of his child pupils at the Adelphi or Mills schools. His missionary activities on behalf of other composers were too numerous and too energetically carried out to be considered helping himself by helping others. Somewhere along the way the naive tactlessness Terman found in him as a boy was replaced by a sweet urbanity. His inter-personal intelligence was sharpened to match his intra-personal life.

For better or worse-probably better-Gardner does not try to work out a scale by which a person's intelligences in the seven different fields could be calibrated and the whole then combined in some way to achieve an over-all rating similar to the IQ. Both Terman and Gardner take it absolutely for granted that most human beings will score high in some spheres, low in others. Terman assumed somewhat wistfully in 1919 that since Henry had chosen music as his profession he would per- force neglect his latent scientific intelligence. Gardner explores in some detail the relations between the various competences he posits, and conceives of all sorts of mixes. Even so, I think he would have found an unusual mix in Cowell, and would have had to rate him high in every one of the seven competences. That peculiar combination of intelligences may explain why critics and historians and public have all had so much trouble placing Henry Cowell in a satisfactory, unmistakable, and permanent niche. His IQ was "matched by scores of others among our records," said Terman. "but there is only one Henry."
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Henry Cowell: Mind over Music