Young and Matured Henry Cowell with his music note.
 
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It is not clear whether HC preferred the winds in movement 1 with
or without hom. The first performances in Los Angeles and New York
were with horn; but the holograph score has no hom part.
 F Here the circumstances of A Composition anticipated exacdy the ones
the piano concerto (no. 440) would face five years later. In each in-
stance the "world premiere" omitted 1 of 3 movements?but A Com-
postion at least did not have to wait 48 years for a complete perfor-
mance on U.S. soil. Movements 1 and 2 were played at the Biltmore
Hotel, Los Angeles, 9 Jan 1926, Winifred Hooke the soloist, with
Adolph Tandler and his Litde Symphony. At Aeolian Hall, New York,
 2Feb 1926, all 3 movements were played, with HC the soloist and
Lamar Stringfield the conductor of a pick-up group that included some
of the top names among New York instrumentalists.
 M (a) Ink full score, paged as above, positive photostats at LC and
NYPL
(b) Pencil sketches of movements 2 (4p) and 3 (lOp), plus 8 parts.
The movement-3 pages are all headed "String Concerto," ap-
parendy HC's early working tide.
 P Score (20p) and parts (no hom) on rental from Peters
 C This composition is unusual not only for its solo "instrument" and for
the three different accompaniments employed in the 3 movements,
but also?as David Tudor pointed out in 1980?for its paternal rela-
tionships. Its opening movement, the first composed, served for a while
in its embryonic stage as the "string concerto" listed by HC in 1924
as CD 294; for 3 years it was the first movement of A Composition;
then it became the first movement of the Concerto for Piano and
Orchestra completed in March 1928 (no. 440). Its second movement,
arranged as a duet for struck and swept strings, became the Duett
to St. Cecilia (no. 406/2a). As in Ensemble (no. 380), HC seems here
to show a certain unsureness or perhaps fluidity in his thinking about
instruments and his writing for them. In "ensemble" and "composi-
tion" he chose the vaguest and most general terms he could find for
what he was writing.
406/2a Duett to St. Cecilia [for piano strings]
[No tempo mark]
 D "For Mrs. Casserly." SRC in a marginal note explains that Mrs. Jack
Casserly was a well-known San Francisco patron of music who at the
time (1925 or 1926, according to HC via SRC*s note on p2) was study-
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