Young and Matured Henry Cowell with his music note.
 
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(no. 696), from which HC borrowed the Tune for movement
 4of the symphony.
(c) On the versos of both pages of AP XVII (no. 690) are a total
of 50m of sketches for movements 1, 3, and 4 of the symphony.
 P Miniature full score, paged as above, copyright 1948, AMP. Materials
on rental from AMP.
 C In an article on HC, Modern Music 23:4 (Fall 1946), p[254]-60,
Edwin Gerschefski cites a work in progress, "an eighteen-minute work
in four parts" entitled Hymn, Air, Dance, and Fuguing Tune. He
cites it apart from and in addition to the Fourth Symphony, but it
is hard to see what else it could have been.
698 March in Three Beats [for voice(s) and piano]
Not too fast
 D This march was commissioned for volume 6 of the American Book
Company's American Singer series by the chief editor of the series,
John W. Beattie; his letter of acknowledgement of receipt is dated
11 Oct 1946.
 T Words put to HC's tune by Dr. Beattie
 M Ink fair copy (3p) among the Beattie papers. Music Library, North-
western University
 P In The American Singer (New York: American Book Co., 1946), VI,
pl78-79 of the students' book, pl60-62 of the teachers' "Guide and
Accompaniments"
 C Here is another example of the "Irish Walking Song" (see Exultation,
no. 328) in the "triple meter" that HC claimed alternates the march-
er's feet on the strong beats and thus tires him less than ordinary du-
ple march meter. That theory might work with triple meter as slow
as the Pilgrims' Chorus in Tannhauser; but if this song, for instance,
is taken slowly enough to allow alternating feet on strong beats then
musically it does not make sense, yet if it is sung up to a musically
suitable tempo then all we have is a 6/8 march, left-right, left-right.
And who can say that putting a foot down on a strong beat tires it
any more than a weak beat? Any marcher knows that an irregular
cadence is more tiring than a regular, swinging, consistent one. If
the Irish were three-legged, of course, then it would make a difference.
699 The Universal Flute [for shakuhachi] Oct. 12, 1946
Tempo rubato, with slow dignity
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