Young and Matured Henry Cowell with his music note.
 
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known as The Temple of the People. The group's monthly periodical,
The Temple Artisan, records in October 1917 (18:4, p244-45) that
on Saturday [18 Aug 1917] during the group's annual August con-
vention, "In the evening on the grounds of the Halcyon Sanatorium
beginning at 8 p.m. the Mystery Play was presented in terms of music,
color, and fire." The date of 18 Aug is evident from an announce-
ment of the production in the San Luis Obispo Tribune of Tuesday,
14 Aug. The Temple Artisan names 13 actors, who were "assisted by
 achorus of about twenty voices," but fails to mention that the piano
accompaniment was provided by HC. "The music was 'home-made,'
so to speak, . . . that of the Seven Isles and Building of Bamba by
Henry Cowell all being of the usual high order of Temple music."
The program printed in the Artisan places a "scene" called The Seven
Isles before The Building of Bamba; but it is clear that it consisted
of the first three of the 14 numbers recorded by HC in CD, and on
the surviving MS, as constituting the first part of Bamba.
 M Surviving at LC from this 1917 production are some 40 loose pages
of pencil sketches and drafts for piano, or voice(s) and piano, lacking
sequential pagination. Of the 14 numbers, there are complete or in-
complete drafts for nos. 2-6, 8, 10, 12, and 13. HC's list omits the
tides of nos. 8 and 9, but The Birth of Midyar is identified as one
of the missing numbers by a note with it from HC via SRC; from
other notes with it the remaining missing number appears to be a song
(otherwise unidentified) by the god Daga or Dagna or possibly The
Red Flame of Midyar (no. 220).
 C See no. 954, a fragment recently come to light.
219/1 The Tides of Manaunaun [Introduction to The Building of Bamba for
piano]
Largo
 D Jul 1917. " The Tides of Manaunaun was written as a prelude to an
opera based on Irish mythology." So speaks HC on Folkways FM-3349
in addition to playing the piece, which represents with massive chord
clusters the waters and all matter rolling through boundless space
ahead of Manaunaun's powerful sweeps. (Manaunaun was, in Irish
mythology as taught by John 0. Varian and quoted by HC, "the god
of motion and of the waves of the sea" who kept the particles of mat-
ter fresh with ceaseless motion until they were needed in the building
of the universe.) The only "opera" HC wrote until his fifties was The
Building of Bamba; it is based on Irish mythology. The first of the
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