Young and Matured Henry Cowell with his music note.
 
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[184] ascends triumphant (but whence and on what wings is not clear).
There is one vocal part (voice not designated; middle range), but in
arranging the 20 Jan 1916 performance HC apparently could not find
 asuitable singer and made do with the text spoken instead of sung.
 C Red Silence was the last of 8 numbers to be presented to the Club
that morning. The program describes it as "an impression of Japan
of archaic days, showing forth by means of dramatic imagination
(aided by music)." The music was played by "Henry Cowles" as com-
poser, orchestrator, and pianist; Miss Cecil Rauhut, violin; Mrs.
William Randall, flute; and Miss Mary Lewis, cello. The librettist,
Mrs. Floye Lewis Giffin, gave the dramatic reading. The scene is set
"high above the clouds on the steep pathway of a shaggy mountain
[where] hangs a rude cot, with its tiny, piteous garden, like a brown
cherry clinging to a leafless branch. Here in autumn's sombre twilight,
the crags transfigured by pale amethystine touches of an almost win-
try sunset. Red Silence [the chief character, described elsewhere as
'Camellia, Red Silence or flower of fate and tragedy'] gathers the last
of the blooms, having waited thus long for the evening dews to refresh
her little garden." There is no score, but the various parts for instru-
mentalists contain cues to guide them in supporting the speaker. From
one of the cues, "Right to Strike," we learn that this rather surprising
phrase has nothing to do with labor unions but is the last phrase in
 aspeech reminiscent of Ecclesiastes:
Lo, to die when it is right to die,
To strike when it is right to strike.
185A Scenario [for voices and instruments?]
 D [ca 1915?]
 C According to HC's mother's notes for 13 Aug 1915, HC had "in re-
cent months" composed a "five-part orchestral piece for Mr. [Charles]
Seeger. It is called A Scenario. It follows an outline written for the
purpose by Jaime de Angulo." She goes on to name four songs (nos.
116, 117, 123, and 159 in this catalog) already composed or adapted
for this "five-part orchestral work, and a number of Child Songs, all
[all four-plus, she means] with words by Clarissa Dixon," together
with nos. 106, 118, and 172 plus "two Shakespeare pieces [two of the
four in no. 104?], music written in old English style." Perhaps she
misunderstood, perhaps HC changed his plans. The only Scenario
known to have been composed by HC is the piano quartet, no. 160.
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