Young and Matured Henry Cowell with his music note.
 
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  14 numbers assigned to it in CD is an introduction, but no introduc-
tion survives with the incomplete materials from the 1917 produc-
tion of Bamba at LC. (I agree with SRC that HC's word "opera" is
not apt; the work is what in my Sunday-school days was called "a
pageant with music.")
HC failed to record The Tides by that name in CD, perhaps con-
sidering at the time that its listing as the introduction to Bamba was
a sufficient record. In addition to his spoken testimony regarding its
origin, however, there are numerous printed references that reflect
his association of The Tides with Bamba in its earlier years before
it acquired other associations. The Daily Palo Alto Times (6 Nov 1920,
p8, col5) announces on that evening's HC program "Prelude to *Bam-
ba' (The Tides of Manaunaun)." Ray C. B. Brown in the San Fran-
cisco Chronicle (8 Nov 1920, p5, coll) remarks on HC's recital the
night before: "Of this [closing] group the most remarkable is the pre-
lude, The Tides of Manaunaun, a tone picture of primeval chaos. ..."
A decade later, Frederick Whitney in The Troubadour (3:8 [Jul 1931],
p6-7) recalls the 1917 Building of Bamba with. music by Cowell that
he says was an improvement over previous music heard at the Hal-
cyon pageants: **In it occurs the well-known and instantly successful
Prelude, The Tides of Manaunaun." Dorothy Varian, daughter-in-
law of John 0. Varian, adds testimony to the same effect in writing
of HC; "One of his most popular compositions. Tides of Manaunaun,
was written as the prelude to John's [her father-in-law's] opera "Bam-
ba" (The Inventor and the Pilot [Palo Alto: Pacific Books, 1983], p 41).
This testimony regarding the birth of The Tides does not necessarily
clash with its prenatal history as argued by SRC in letters and con-
versations: that HC spoke of it as having been composed as early as
1912, as being his earliest work to remain in the repertoire decades
later, and that certain old friends recall some knowledge of it from
before 1917. HC may have conceived the idea for it, may have worked
it out in his mind, may even have played some version of it before
1917. But his statement on Folkways FM-3349 is concise and direct:
The Tides was composed "as a prelude to an opera based on Irish
mythology"; and programs and reviews for some years after 1917 refer
to it as the prelude to The Building of Bamba.

The earliest surviving version known is the 1922 sheet music, which
is dedicated to Julia D. Brown. That dedication was omitted in the
1960 reprint but restored in the 1982 publication.
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